Saturday, 11 June 2016

In All Thy Sons Command

So it's looking very likely that the (English) Canadian national anthem is going to be changed to be "gender neutral", much to the consternation of seemingly everyone willing to put their opinions out there. For those unversed, the English variation of the Canadian national anthem goes as follows:
O Canada!
Our home and native land!
True patriot love in all thy sons command.
With glowing hearts we see thee rise,
The True North strong and free!
From far and wide,
O Canada, we stand on guard for thee.
God keep our land glorious and free!
O Canada, we stand on guard for thee.
O Canada, we stand on guard for thee.
The proposed bill, put forth by a Liberal party MP dying of ALS (presumably as his final wish to improve his country), wishes to change "in all thy sons command" to "in all of us command". As one could expect, this proposal has unleashed a shitstorm of fury from people calling the proposal a shame to every soldier who has died fighting under that anthem and that it's just the "political correctness police" forcing us to change over nothing. Naturally, the dishonouring veterans argument is a common tactic amongst so-called "patriots" in any sort of national debate like this, although it isn't particularly effective since the proposed changes are closer to the original lyrics (pre-1914) and "O Canada" didn't even become our official anthem until 1980 (with the only major non-peace-keeping operation since that point being the Afghan War). On the other side, we have people claiming that those who don't want the anthem changed are supporting sexism, which just reeks of attempting to shame people out of arguing with them*.


Saturday, 28 May 2016

Conjuring Your Perception

So recently I have been rocking out to "Termination" by Book of Black Earth on a pretty regular basis. I think my favourite part of the song though is the last minute or so, which closes with a rather intriguing sample from an interview panel featuring a Christian and a Satanist. As you would probably expect from this sort of setup, the Christian interviewee gets trounced in the debate:
Christian Dude: "To suggest that you can create your own reality, my goodness, that's what they did in Tiananmen Square. That's what they did in Germany in 1933. [...] These are examples of people who created their own reality."
Satanist Dude: "Everyone creates their own reality, the thing is, you speak for a consensus of reality that is acceptable. We speak for one which, at this point in history, is not acceptable."
Christian Dude: "Oh, so it's a question of who manipulates the media, who has the most money to put their reality forth? But would you pardon me for saying that I find the world where your ability to conjure your own reality that you perceive as being a very frightening world for people like me. Because you see, I am guided by some codified rules that tell me what is right and wrong. In your world, I'm not so sure I'd feel very safe."
Satanist Dude: "Well that's your problem. [...] In the Satanic world of the future, Christian churches will be allowed to continue, because they pose no threats to us. We don't need Christianity, Christianity needs us."*
The Christian interviewee's obliviousness to the fact that everyone is conjuring their own reality to at least some degree is just the first of many events that have occurred to me recently which have gotten me thinking about perception and reality. As the old saying goes, "seeing is believing", but it seems pretty clear that our perception is not necessarily truth. Maybe this is a pretty obvious statement when you really think about it, but it seems like many people just aren't confronted face-first with this idea, even though it plays a major role in much of human conflict (both on the large and small scale).


Monday, 2 May 2016

Vengeance Is Mine

So I finally got around to seeing The Revenant last night. I enjoyed it, maybe not quite as much as Birdman though (that said, it was clearly intended to be more of a crowd-pleaser than Alejandro G. Iñárritu's big Oscar winner). As I often do when I see an interesting film, I decided to Google it to see what sort of conversation was still on-going around it. The first entry on Google's news feed really caught my eye though: The Revenant Calls for Critical Christian Response.


Having just watched the film, I find the notion of Christian critics considering The Revenant to be a very good film for Christian audiences to be a baffling notion. It's about as pure an example of the revenge narrative as you can get, a concept which (while very popular amongst storytellers and audiences) is very much at odds with the Christian philosophy of radical enemy-love and "turning the other cheek". The article agrees with me on this response, and also lists 10 films which are typically considered very "Christian" within the popular critical consensus:

  1. The Matrix
  2. The Tree of Life
  3. O Brother, Where Art Thou?
  4. American Beauty
  5. Fight Club
  6. The Lord of the Rings
  7. The Shawshank Redemption
  8. Magnolia
  9. Braveheart
  10. Saving Private Ryan
Now, aside from The Matrix, The Tree of Life and The Lord of the Rings, which are all bursting with Christian themes, many of these films seem like a stretch to me. I mean, The Shawshank Redemption is all about hope, but that's hardly a theme that really resonates with damn near everyone (hence why it has been IMDb's top rated film for close to a decade now). Saving Private Ryan is arguably a Christ metaphor if you twist it into a pretzel, but if for example I was asked to mark a paper based on this argument I'd have a hard time accepting the premise. And what the literal hell is Fight Club doing on this list? As much as I loved that film, it is far easier to argue that it is a Marxist film and/or satire of modern macho-masculinity than a Christian film. I have no idea where they even start that argument. I'm sure there are other films on there which are just as baffling (unfortunately, I haven't seen (enough of) American Beauty, Magnolia or Braveheart to comment on them, but I have a hard time seeing Braveheart in particular as being a Christian narrative.

Wednesday, 27 April 2016

IC2S Playlist Update 27/04/2016

In case you haven't been paying attention, we are now just past the IC2S Playlist's 1 year anniversary. At 9 1/2 hours and 104 songs long, I find it quite enjoyable to throw on shuffle when I'm at work. I'm going to continue to update it irregularly from here on, but I don't think I'll write up big update posts like this anymore, mainly because I felt like they spammed the blog with useless posts that people didn't care about, and the effort I put into writing them was taking up potential effort that could have been going towards the backlog of topics that I actually had some interest in writing about. That's more-or-less why I started making the playlist updates into more "regular" blog posts a couple months ago, but it'll be nice not to have weekly updates hanging over my head from here on out.


Anyway, we're gonna close out the year with 2 songs I wanted to add for months now. First is "Dear John Piper" by Showbread. I had been debating picking this song for a while because it's a very IC2S-type song (it's about the destructive theology of Calvinism/predestination... which, again, is totally something I'm into). I kind of wish that the whole song wasn't being yelled out, but after a few listens it works pretty well, and contrasts well with the furious preaching towards the latter-half of the song. I quite enjoy it, it's my kind of deliciously angry.

Secondly we have "Empire of the Clouds" by Iron Maiden, which closes us out with the longest song on the entire playlist. It's also worth pointing out that this epic was written and performed by a group of nearly 60 year old men, which is just insane for an 80s rock/metal band in this day and age. Very few artists can remain relevant for a decade, let alone the 35+ years that Iron Maiden has been rocking our faces (although they did start to slip into irrelevance through the 90s, releasing their 4 indisputably worst albums back-to-back, but have been putting out high quality stuff again since 2000). I mean, just think about how irrelevant The Rolling Stones have been for years, or even other bands with mini-comebacks like Aerosmith have long since slipped back into obscurity (even Black Sabbath/Ozzy Osbourne to some degree). Even better, they seem to be edging back towards my preferred era of Iron Maiden, the Powerslave/Seventh Son of a Seventh Son sound with its heavy concepts, sweeping epics and technical virtuosity. I maintain that Seventh Son of a Seventh Son is my favourite Maiden album, and it's too bad that they ditched that sound in favour of the mediocrity they chased throughout the 90s. Now that we have The Book of Souls, who knows what limits Maiden still has within them?


Also, coincidentally, I have put together a small one-off playlist which just happened to coincide with this 1 year anniversary. Basically, I was listening to Sabaton's "The Rise of Evil" the other day, which got me wondering whether it could be considered part of a "musical trilogy". "The Rise of Evil" would be part 1, followed by "The Final Solution" as part 2 and then finishing with... well, I wasn't sure if they had a third song that could fit in well enough. The result of this is a playlist I titled "Sabaton - The Rise and Fall of Evil", which basically is a recounting of the history of Nazi Germany in WWII. I personally think that the compilation gels together very well and tells a rather compelling story: a madman rising to power, the Nazis' early victories, the Holocaust, the Allies uniting and turning the tide, and then the German people coming to grips with the evil they had been fighting in the name of for almost 6 years. I definitely recommend checking it out, either search it on Spotify or go to the IC2S Playlist sidebar and then click on my username.

Friday, 22 April 2016

Love the Sinner, Period.

I am 2 years late on this story, but my father told me about the Benham brothers, a real estate family-duo who had a reality TV show lined up with HGTV, but which was cancelled when it was revealed that one of the brothers was active in anti-LGBTQ protests. Someone had played a video about them at his Bible study, where he was saying they were pressured out of their TV deal by HGTV because they wouldn't compromise on their faith. This sounded rather suspicious and obviously one-sided to me (plus it's not like the world needed another shitty real estate reality TV show/60-minute home improvement commercial anyway), so I looked into it and it would seem that Right Wing Watch made some (arguably hyperbolic) statements about one of the brothers' views on homosexuality and the "gay agenda".


If you follow conservative evangelical circles, all the stuff they said is pretty much par for the course for that kind of worldview. This represented a rift between what was reported to me and what seems to have actually happened though - this was represented to me as the brothers being persecuted for being Christians and pressured to cave in to "The World", whereas it seems like the show was actually cancelled because of shitty public statements that one of the brothers had made. Is this religious persecution? I think it would be hard to argue that it isn't religious persecution in a sense, but do I feel sorry for him? Not really, because he's being persecuted for not being able to persecute others (and if you believe that the show was cancelled due to persecution over being a Christian, then you're basically saying that a core aspect of Christianity is the right to discriminate against LGBTQ people). If we simply looked at the brothers immediately after the HGTV cancellation then I'd be willing to potentially feel some sympathy for them, since they seemed to be just getting strung up for some statements made a few years earlier. However, that time is long past and they seem to be leveraging their persecution complex to get political attention. Naturally, they're from North Carolina and have been showing up in the news lately saying stupid bullshit which is further solidifying the accusations that, hey, maybe these guys just don't like gays.

Wednesday, 20 April 2016

IC2S Playlist Update 20/04/2016


So we're now just a week short of the playlist's 1 year anniversary, and the point where I'm probably going to stop updating it so regularly (or, at the very least, stop flooding the blog every week with Playlist updates that I doubt anyone actually cares about). The limited time is actually making it a little difficult to pick music, and I was actually going to pick some Impending Doom or Project 86... however, then Volbeat announced Seal the Deal & Let's Boogie and released "The Devil's Bleeding Crown". If the rest of the album is as good as this single, then we're going to be in for an absolute treat! Volbeat tends to be a bit of a singles-oriented band (similarly to Disturbed), meaning that this might be best of the best on the album, but I'm glad to hear that their sound seems to only be getting better. We'll have to see I guess when the album drops.

Going along with that, I also picked "Babylon the Murderer" by P.O.D., which is pretty much universally considered one of their best songs in recent years. I've always liked how P.O.D. has a very reggae-influenced sound, and this has to be one of their best examples of mixing it with their signature hard rock.


...Anyway, I'm going to make this a little shorter than normal just cuz what I originally was planning on writing about has ended up getting spun off into a whole post of its own that I'll put up later this week. Look forward to it!

Monday, 18 April 2016

Quick Fix: Meme-o Kylo Ren

This probably shouldn't be a super controversial statement, but I rather like Kylo Ren. In my mind, he's the Star Wars equivalent of John Maguire - a very confused kid who gets caught up with the wrong people because he never had any proper guidance and then, before he can really realize it, he's in a terrorist organization. This is a rather fascinating, timely and even untraditionally tragic characterization to give to a villain, one with plenty of amazing opportunity to either make him double-down on the villainy and become something truly monstrous or (and I'm hoping that this is what happens in Episode 8) have him begin to mature and realize that "holy shit, what am I doing with my life?" and attempt to make amends.


Naturally, with that sort of setup, the whole conversation about Kylo Ren has devolved into "emo", angsty, whiner kid. This wasn't the case immediately after release, but as soon as Emo Kylo Ren occurred, suddenly it was his defining character trait and people began harping on it. I'm gonna be honest, I've seen The Force Awakens four times now and I don't really get where this is coming from. He only ever angsts once in the whole film, and that's when he gets confronted by his father (who he doesn't particularly like). Oh, and he breaks stuff twice, but is that really enough for people to label him as "whiny"? If nothing else, he is considerably less whiny than Anakin was in the prequels, and infinitely less insufferable and more understandable even when he is angsting.

There's got to be some sort of word for this, where the public conversation ends up colouring the perception of a character. It's sort of like a cognitive version of Flanderization; Memefication might be the most accurate term for it at the moment. We saw the same sort of thing happen last year with Jurassic World, an incredibly flawed movie which people couldn't legitimately criticize without wasting all their time on Claire's heels. I didn't notice or give a shit about the heels while watching the film, they're really inconsequential and hardly that unusual in these sorts of silly action movies. However, that's what the conversation gravitated towards, so by God we're going to beat this meme into the ground.


This seems to be something that's only getting more prevalent due to the Internet allowing petty little complaints or skewed perceptions to echo throughout popular culture. That's not to say that it didn't exist before that though - arguably the absolute best example is Batman & Robin, since every time it gets brought up someone will go "oh yeah, that one is terrible, I mean they put nipples on Batman!", as if that alone is some sort of signifier for why the movie was awful (that's putting aside the actual problems of poor/overly-hammy performances, crass self-commercialization, bonkers directing, etc which make Batnipples look cute in comparison). Obviously this is not something super important in and of itself, but it is something worth paying attention to as you can perceptibly see how the conversation about a piece of media changes as the memes solidify.

...and to end on a completely unrelated topic, check out my badass Kylo Ren cosplay!

Ladies.